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Difference between revisions of "Dodge Challenger (1970–4)"

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[[Image:1970_Dodge_Challenger_RT.jpg]]
 
[[Image:1970_Dodge_Challenger_RT.jpg]]
  
'''Dodge Challenger (E-body). 1970–4 (prod. 165,437). 2-door coupé. F/R, 198, 225 in³ (6 cyl. OHV), 318, 340, 360, 383, 426, 440 in³ (V8 OHV).''' Not quite a twin to the revamped 1970 [[Plymouth Barracuda (1970–4)|Plymouth Barracuda]] (which was shorter and narrower, with 2 in less in the wheelbase), but closely related. Weighty but not more so than contemporary [[Ford Mustang]], and looked more balanced as a pony car. Helped by powerful engines, including the last of the big blocks (the 440 in³ RB) before the Clean Air Act kicked in for 1972 model year (383, 426, 440 in³ deleted). At the time, usually owned by drivers who pushed them hard; survivors will generally be in the hands of collectors. Styled by Carl Cameron, who designed the 1966 [[Dodge Charger]], with more restraint than the 1971 Charger. No replacement due to [[Chrysler]] focusing on economy models—just as the pony car market boomed.
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'''Dodge Challenger (E-body). 1970–4 (prod. 165,437). 2-door coupé, 2-door convertible. F/R, 198, 225 in³ (6 cyl. OHV), 318, 340, 360, 383, 426, 440 in³ (V8 OHV).''' Not quite a twin to the revamped 1970 [[Plymouth Barracuda (1970–4)|Plymouth Barracuda]] (which was shorter and narrower, with 2 in less in the wheelbase), but closely related. Weighty but not more so than contemporary [[Ford Mustang]], and looked more balanced as a pony car. Convertibles to end of 1971. Helped by powerful engines, including the last of the big blocks (the 440 in³ RB) before the Clean Air Act kicked in for 1972 model year (383, 426, 440 in³ deleted). At the time, usually owned by drivers who pushed them hard; survivors will generally be in the hands of collectors. Styled by Carl Cameron, who designed the 1966 [[Dodge Charger]], with more restraint than the 1971 Charger. No replacement due to [[Chrysler]] focusing on economy models—just as the pony car market boomed.
  
  

Revision as of 09:48, 10 January 2010

1970 Dodge Challenger RT.jpg

Dodge Challenger (E-body). 1970–4 (prod. 165,437). 2-door coupé, 2-door convertible. F/R, 198, 225 in³ (6 cyl. OHV), 318, 340, 360, 383, 426, 440 in³ (V8 OHV). Not quite a twin to the revamped 1970 Plymouth Barracuda (which was shorter and narrower, with 2 in less in the wheelbase), but closely related. Weighty but not more so than contemporary Ford Mustang, and looked more balanced as a pony car. Convertibles to end of 1971. Helped by powerful engines, including the last of the big blocks (the 440 in³ RB) before the Clean Air Act kicked in for 1972 model year (383, 426, 440 in³ deleted). At the time, usually owned by drivers who pushed them hard; survivors will generally be in the hands of collectors. Styled by Carl Cameron, who designed the 1966 Dodge Charger, with more restraint than the 1971 Charger. No replacement due to Chrysler focusing on economy models—just as the pony car market boomed.


Manufacturing locations: Hamtramck, Michigan, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA

Marque: Dodge | Model: Dodge Challenger


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